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Kids’ Art in Pinehurst Pocket Park

September’s art in Pinehurst Pocket Park is a wonderful bird painting made by eight year old Leif. It’s cheerful colors really perk up the park! Check it out in the kiosk at NE117th St & 19th Ave NE. Leif is a student of artist Victoria Raymond, who offers art lessons in her Pinehurst studio for both youth and adults.   http://victoriaraymond.com
If your child (or you!) would like to show art in the park, contact PocketPark@PinehurstSeattle.org.

98125 Comparison of 2010 & 2020 Census Data

The chart below shows some data comparing demographics of our zip code, 98125, between 2010’s census and 2020’s. 98125’s boundaries are NE 100th St, 1st Ave NE, NE 145th St, and Lake Washington.

There are still many more white people living here, to an extent due to systemic racism and its legacy. For instance, a real estate plat containing more than 400 properties in the southeast corner of Pinehurst actually had a covenant that said, “Said tract shall not be sold, leased, or rented to any person or persons other than of Caucasian race nor shall any person or persons other than of Caucasian race use or occupy said tract.” Olympic Hills had a similar restrictive covenant. The 1968 Fair Housing Act voided these kinds of covenants, but you can still see them on the original plat documents. Here’s a map of tracts that had restrictive covenants: http://depts.washington.edu/civilr/covenants_map.htm. Not all the plats in 98125 had such covenants, but many real estate agents would steer people of color away from these white areas in north Seattle.

The chart below, showing percent change of different demographics, indicates progress is being made in overcoming both social and legal impediments in real estate in our neighborhood.

Lake City Customer Service Center Reopens

The city’s Lake City Customer Service Center has reopened. It was closed for a long time due to covid-19. It’s in the Lake City Library building, at 12525 28th Ave NE, on the 2nd floor. 206-684-7526. It’s open Tuesday through Saturday, 9 am – 5 pm.
There, you can apply for a passport, pay for utility bills, pet licenses, or parking tickets; get information about the city, including job opportunities, crime prevention, food banks, and public transit schedules; attend a free legal clinic; GET A VOTER REGISTRATION FORM; access the internet for free … and more.
For other reopenings of service centers, public counters, libraries, etc, click here.

Know the Signs of Heat Stroke and Heat Exhaustion

Here are the signs of heat stroke and heat exhaustion. For information about staying cool and safe in high heat conditions from King County: https://kingcounty.gov/…/preparing…/hot-weather.aspx

Taste of Eritrea – August 28, 2021

St. George Church Property Update

After I posted an update on the property on NE 125th St that the city bought to be a park/floodplain, a reader in the comments section wondered about the status of the vacant property that housed St. George Episcopal Church at 2212 NE 125th St. The most recent info I’d seen was in this 2019 article: https://ecww.org/important-information-regarding-the-former-site-of-st-george-seattle/
Here is an update today from the Episcopalian Diocese property manager:

The diocese is still trying to develop the property as a community of homes.  It’s still waiting for the City to give it building permits.  The process began in 2016.  The site has some challenges because of Thornton Creek, mature trees, and the usual sort of city planning concerns.  The pandemic slowed the work of the city planning department considerably.

The diocese has paid for twice-daily security patrols since 2016.  It fenced in the property to reduce illegal uses and camping.  It also stopped permitting the property to be used by any group in 2019.

Once it receives the building permits, the existing building will be demolished and it will begin the process of building nine (9) homes on the property.  There will be a memorial garden to remember Saint George that will have parts of the church incorporated into the common garden area.  The city prohibits any alteration to Thornton Creek, and no earth moving work can take place during the rainy season.

August Silly Walk in Pinehurst Pocket Park

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Calling all kids and kids-at-heart! Take a stroll in Pinehurst Pocket Park and note the two signs along one stretch of the path. You are invited to break into a silly walk between the signs! Have someone take a video of your silly walk, and post it in our Facebook group if you’re a member (good reason to join if you’re not!). Kids, challenge your friends and cheer them on! Wear funny costumes!

Based on the Monty Python Ministry of Silly Walks sketch.

The pocket park is at NE117th St and 19th Ave NE. There will be a silly walk at Victory Heights Playground, also. It’s at NE106th St & 19th Ave NE. The signs will be up throughout August.

Click here for the post in our Facebook group and an example video.

 

Kids’ Art in Pinehurst Pocket Park

The art in Pinehurst Pocket Park for August is a beautiful bird made by eight year old Brin this summer. It looks great in the park! Check it out in the kiosk at NE117th St & 19th Ave NE. Brin is a student of artist Victoria Raymond, who offers art lessons in her Pinehurst studio for both youth and adults. http://victoriaraymond.com
If your child (or you!) would like to show art in the park, contact PocketPark@PinehurstSeattle.org.

Lake City Floodplain Park Update

Here are some notes I took about the 1.5 acre Lake City Floodplain Park (the big property on NE125th St that the city bought) at the Thornton Creek Alliance (TCA) meeting last night, July 29.

Our King County Council Representative, Rod Dembowski, has been a great help throughout the purchase process, both helping Seattle realize the value of buying it to help restore/protect the Thornton Creek Watershed, and procuring funds through grants to buy and develop it. Thanks, Rod!

We can be thankful, also, to the owners, who wanted the land to be used by the community, and to the real estate, who procured TCA first right of refusal for the purchase, which allowed the property to stay off the market long enough for the city to be persuaded it was worth buying.

The two houses will be torn down by the end of September, and a big black locust tree is scheduled to be removed so its prolific reseeding won’t be a constant problem.

A non-profit based at Magunson Park, Mid-Sound Fisheries Enhancement Group, has been tapped to lead the habitat restoration. Being a non-profit makes it easy to use grant money for the project. Goals are 1) make it a green space with community access; 2) improve flood storage in the watershed; 3) provide quality habitat for critters. Note: salmon can’t reach that property yet due to some culverts, but future plans include altering the culverts to allow salmon to come through.

Seattle Public Utilities and Seattle Parks will be heavily involved, and will do the long-term maintenance when the project is completed. A consultant team has been hired to carry out the community engagement plan Mid-Sound Fisheries developed. Currently it is collecting info on neighborhood groups, churches, communities and such to reach out to. Pinehurst Community Council has asked to be on the list. The first community workshop will be virtual in the fall. A project website is being developed, from which you can sign up for the mailing list and take surveys.

Community feedback will include giving them ideas about neighborhood access to the park. There is no parking along NE125th St, so it will be a walk-to place. It is a floodplain, so access might be an overlook, or (my idea) a boardwalk, or???

The current schedule, assuming funding will keep rolling in, is:

  • Winter/spring – Community engagement
  • 2022-2023 – Preliminary design
  • 2023-2024 – Construction

After the Mid-Fisheries Enhancement Group presentation, Warren King George, Muckleshoot Tribe Historian, suggested some indigenous names for the property.

Northgate Ped/Bike Bridge Update

Northgate Ped/Bike Bridge 101: Bridge snapshot

  • 1,900 feet long, extending from North Seattle College on the west to Sound Transit’s Northgate Link light rail station on the east
  • 16 feet wide, with amenities such as benches at wildlife overlooks just west of I-5
  • Opening October 2021
The following construction activities will be taking place over the next several weeks:
 East side of I-5 (1st Ave NE between NE 92nd and NE 107th)
  • Installing signage, cable, and fencing
  • Electrical work
  • Grading and pouring curbs
  • Installing the irrigation system and landscaping
  • Parking drainage, resurfacing and striping

West side of I-5 (north side of North Seattle College and along N 100th St)

  • Placing concrete for bridge approach
  • Grading and planting the surrounding landscaping
  • Installation of art
  • Removing the construction office trailers

I-5 median (near the I-5 northbound express lane at NE 103rd St)

  • Nighttime removal of temporary support structures from bridge span (temporary nighttime lane and offramp closures)
  • Curb work
  • Grading and landscaping
  • Electrical work

Questions or concerns?
Visit the project webpage for more information and updates, or contact SDOT with any questions:
NorthgateBridge@seattle.gov or 206-905-3620