Nutcracker Sweets in Lake City November 14

Looking for an alternative to the Pacific Northwest Ballet’s production of the Nutcracker? This local, family-friendly production at a fabulous price is a great way to celebrate the holiday season. It’s sized-down; its excerpted nature makes this performance more child-friendly and non-artsy-boyfriend/girlfriend date-worthy.

After the production, guests may take photos with the performers! Of course, sweets will be served.

Ticket prices per show: $10/pp, $9 seniors, under 12 free

Tickets are available at Lake City Community Center (cash or check) or online at  http://www.brownpapertickets.com/event/894109]

Nutcracker

Reporting Suspicious Behavior – Anonymity

Seattle_Police_BadgeThis is Part 5 of a 5 part series on Reporting Suspicious Behavior. It’s from a flyer handed out by the police at the North Precinct Advisory Council.

Some people are reluctant to call 911 because they are concerned that the person(s) about whom they called will know they reported them. You need not be concerned about this. When officers make contact with a person about whom you called, it is not typical that they will tell the person, ‘Mrs. Martin over at 3001 said you were causing trouble over here.’ While it is preferred that a person provide their normal contact number so the police can call back to verify information, it is not necessary.  The important thing is to report the activity. Further, you can request that your name not be disclosed. You can also request to remain anonymous. And, you can also request that officers not contact you in person. If you are concerned that you will be identified as the person who called 911, just relay to the call take that you don’t want your name disclosed and you don’t want contact.

This concludes our series on reporting suspicious behavior. Remember that it is always better to report a person or situation and have it turn out not to be a crime or hazard than to not report and find out later a crime was in fact committed. By the way, you won’t get in trouble for reporting something you feel is suspicious and upon checking it out, it is discovered that nothing was amiss.

Find It, Fix It Mobile Phone App

Screen shot of the Find It, Fix It mobile app home page.“Find It, Fix It” is a smartphone app offering mobile users an easy way to report selected issues to the City of Seattle.

With Find It, Fix It, reporting an issue is as easy as snapping a photo with your smartphone, adding detailed information, and hitting Submit. The map’s “drag and drop” feature or the phone’s own technology can be used to pinpoint the location.

Android users can download the app from the Google Play Store and iPhone users can download it from the App Store.

The app offers the following service request categories:

  • Abandoned Vehicles: report vehicles parked in a public right-of-way more than three days.
  • Graffiti: report graffiti, including what it is on — parking meter, utility pole or building — so it gets automatically routed to the appropriate department for response.
  • Illegal Dumping: report illegal dumping — junk, garbage or debris — on public property, including roadsides, open streets and paved alleys.
  • Pothole: report a pothole.
  • Parking Enforcement: make an inquiry regarding a parking concern.
  • Streetlight Report: report a streetlight outage or damaged streetlight.
  • Other Inquiry: this miscellaneous category is for making an inquiry or request not listed above, which will be processed by the City’s Customer Service Bureau. Mobile users should choose this category to provide feedback.

The app also provides a link to m.seattle.gov, the mobile version of the City of Seattle’s website.

Once you download and use Find It, Fix It, you can submit feedback using the app’s “other inquiry” category, found under the “New Request” icon.

Master Ricky’s Haunted Cemetery – Halloween

pumpkinMaster Ricky’s Haunted Cemetery will be open Halloween night from 7pm until 10pm.

Children must be accompanied by an adult (over 18). This is a family-friendly haunted walk-through and we will do our best to create an environment which is scary but not traumatizing. There will be no blood and no grabbing of guests.

Candy will be available for guests upon exiting from the production.

The address is 1910 120th St. in Pinehurst.

Hope to see you there!

Master Ricky’s Haunted Cemetery – Preview

pumpkinHello Neighbors! Master Ricky’s Haunted Cemetery will be open for Pinehurst neighborhood children and parents to preview the cemetery on Thursday from 4:30pm until 6:00pm for pumpkin carving. There will be no costumes, no scary music, no creepy lighting.

They will provide one pumpkin per family and carving utensils for those who RSVP. Please email Merideth at meridethblock@hotmail.com or send her a message through Pinehurst Seattle Facebook to RSVP. You can bring your own pumpkins from home. Pumpkins are welcome to stay and become part of the cemetery, if you like.

Hope to see you there!

 

 

Pinehurst Picks

Two neighbors sent in photos of this clever wraith, I mean sunflower. Tis the season, enjoy!

ErikaSunflower GarthSunflower

 

 

Please feel free to send in photos of art – or anything unexpected and fun – you see on your walks around the neighborhood to info@pinehurstseattle.org.

Free Movie @George on October 28th

 

ScreenShot001

Thornton Creek Alliance Meeting October 23

 

TCAmeeting

Pinehurst Picks

Looks like the place we get Pinehurst tee shirts and grocery bags screen printed has a new paint job! Half of the mural is this week’s Pinehurst pick.

NWScreenprint15&115-B

Please feel free to send in photos of art – or anything unexpected and fun – you see on your walks around the neighborhood to info@pinehurstseattle.org.

Reporting Suspicious Behavior – Calling 911 From a Cell Phone

Seattle_Police_BadgeThis is Part 4 of a 5 part series on Reporting Suspicious Behavior. It’s from a flyer handed out by the police at the North Precinct Advisory Council.

When you call 911 from a land line, the 911 call center knows from what address you are calling. If the person calling 911 is unable to speak (for instance if the person is having a medical emergency), the call taker knows the address and can send emergency responders.  Even so, the call taker will ask your exact location.

Knowing your exact location becomes even more important when you call 911 from a cell phone. When calling 911 from a cell phone, you will be routed to the jurisdiction in which you are located. For example, if you have a cell phone that has a Tacoma or even a Portland area code, but you are in Seattle and call 911, you will be routed to Seattle’s 911 center. However, depending on where you are in Seattle, you may be connected with Seattle Police Department, Washington State Patrol (if you are on a freeway), King County, or another jurisdiction that borders Seattle. The 911 operator will only see your cell phone number and your general location based on the cell tower closest to where you are.

Since the 911 center you contact will only know the general area from where you are calling, always tell the 911 call taker where you are so they can transfer you to the correct jurisdiction, if necessary. The 911 call taker needs your specific physical address or nearest intersection. Don’t assume they know; remember that cell phones do not give your exact location.

Part 5 will be about identifying yourself (or not) when calling 911.